Press

Emily Books Launch

The Consolation Prize: Emily Gould

March 12, 2014

We strive to avoid labeling the books we sell. A lot of them are unclassifiable and we love that, though it does make marketing them and ourselves more challenging. It would be a lot easier to be like “we’re a FEMINIST bookclub, we’re a QUEER bookclub”. But though we are a feminist queer bookclub we are also really stubborn and hellbent on just being our own thing.

Mark Doten, Soho Press

A Missing Revenue Stream From Mobile Apps

December 14, 2013

The core appeal of these kinds of services is that they cut though the cascade of stories, tweets, links and other media that flow across our screens every day, and serve up something reliably good.

Jenna Wortham, New York Times

Digital bookstore Emily Books launches iOS subscription app for ebooks

September 30, 2013

[Emily Gould] said, “I got really excited about the idea of an iOS app because that’s how I read books. I loved the idea of just getting a push notification that a book was ready for me to read.”

Laura Hazard Owen, Gigaom

2 New Totally Affordable Apps

October 2, 2013

A WHOLE BOOK. IN A PRETTY FORMAT. ON YOUR PHONE.

Logan Sachon, The Billfold

77. READ.LOOK.THINK.

October 7, 2013

Jessica Stanley

Harper’s Magazine Launch

The New Harper’s Magazine App

December 18, 2013

29th Street Publishing has launched a number of brilliantly-conceived and designed free-standing magazine apps (Maura Magazine, The Awl), but this is the first app they’ve created based on an existing print publication. It’s a richly- and elegantly-designed, user-friendly edition that for my money is far superior to the Harper’s print magazine.

Robert Newman, Newmanology

163-year-old Harper’s Magazine now available for iOS

November 18, 2013

The publication has been notoriously technology shy, but now readers can grab a digital subscription via Apple’s Newsstand app.

Michael Grothaus, TUAW

Harper’s Magazine joins the digital age with a proper iOS app

November 17, 2013

It’s a welcome digital-friendly move for Harper’s readers ... providing a way for the consistently excellent magazine to grow among a print-free market.

David Pierce, The Verge

Harper’s Magazine on iPad/iPhone

November 17, 2013

Not only is this a big release, but it also marks the first title from 29th that has been approved as a “replica” by the Alliance of Audited Media — so sales get combined with the print edition when it comes to calculating distribution.

The Magaziner

Harper’s Magazine finally gets an iPhone app as 29th Street Publishing hits 20 titles

November 15, 2013

New York-based 29th Street is a so-called sub-compact publisher, specializing in affordable custom apps for quality publications like The Awl. Co-founder David Jacobs told me by phone that the company worked with Harper’s to develop a custom template that connotes the elegant font and design of the magazine.

Jeff John Roberts, Gigaom

Harper’s Magazine launches iOS app, holds tight to paid strategy

November 15, 2013

Not only is this a big release, but it also marks the first title from 29th that has been approved as a “replica” by the Alliance of Audited Media — so sales get combined with the print edition when it comes to calculating distribution.

Hamish McKenzie, Pando Daily

Digital Holdout Harper’s Magazine Launches Its First App

November 13, 2013

Harper’s Magazine, which has been ambivalent about joining the digital revolution, is releasing its first app this week.

Todd Wasserman, Mashable

Harper’s Magazine on iPad/iPhone

November 17, 2013

Not only is this a big release, but it also marks the first title from 29th that has been approved as a replica by the Alliance of Audited Media — so sales get combined with the print edition when it comes to calculating distribution.

Jean Snow, The Magaziner

Harper’s Magazine finally gets an iPhone app as 29th Street Publishing hits 20 titles

November 15, 2013

Longtime digital hold-out Harper’s has finally joined the mobile world. Here’s a look, plus some new observations on sub-compact publishing by 29th Street, an emerging leader in the digital magazine world.

Jeff John Roberts, Gigaom

Harper’s Magazine launches iOS app, holds tight to paid strategy

November 15, 2013

The new app retains the Harper’s font and design aesthetic and is more friendly to a touchscreen experience. The overall product, however, still feels like a print magazine that has been adapted for a digital format, rather than a digital-native publication.

Hamish McKenzie, Pando Daily

Harper’s Magazine is Finally Ready for the Digital Revolution

July 8, 2013

...there are a few options for magazine brands like Harper’s that want to make their content shareable without giving away the store including limited online subscriptions (like, say, 10 articles a month) or giving subscribers the ability to share articles. Barring such innovations, a new app will be a big step. Harper’s will be available on Apple’s Newsstand, giving it much greater visibility. Best of all, consumers will be able to buy single issues of the magazine on their tablets. ”

Todd Wasserman, Mashable

29th Street at the Modern Magazine Conference

The Modern Magazine

November 13, 2013

The magazine industry has continually been written off in recent years, yet magazines continue to be published and read. Despite fewer big launches and smaller budgets, magazine makers have risen to the challenging times and we are witnessing one of the most exciting creative eras in editorial thinking and innovation.

Luke Tonge, FormFiftyFive

You need 1,000 true fans to make a sustainable magazine and 5,000 to start making a living.

November 11, 2013

You just need to make sure you build a core group that absolutely loves what you do.

Flipping Pages Blog

The Modern Magazine Conference.

October 25, 2013

David Jacobs talked about how the career arc of editors and publishers has changed dramatically. As they need to diversify their skill sets, there‘s similarities in the way designers have become typesetters, repro houses etc.

Ben Serbutt, Ben Serbutt

Notes from the Modern Magazine Conference

October 23rd, 2013

David was our only digital speaker, but his company is proud of their love of print and promote themselves on that basis – the word ‘reader’ looms larger than ‘user’... He also offered the memorable figure that 1000 regular readers make a sustainable magazine but with 5000 you can earn a living.

Jeremy Leslie, magCulture

Ten Gems from The Modern Magazine

October 18rd, 2013

You need 1,000 true fans to make a sustainable magazine and 5,000 to start making a living.

Fraser Allen, White Light Media

Reflecting on The Modern Magazine

October 17th, 2013

David explained that he and his partner wanted to create a digital publishing tool based on great reading and writing experiences, and noted that the 29th Street model matches the changing arc of the typical publishing career. There was a time when journalists could expect to train, find a job and then be employed for the rest of their lives, but today’s journalists tend to be much more entrepreneurial, and 29th Street helps to facilitate that.

Steve Watson, Stack Magazines

What People Are Saying

Literary Bohemia Goes Digital

March 17, 2014

I think our culture is still trying to figure out how to create a digital magazine, and while we view our print magazine as a throwback to an earlier era we see the online edition as an opportunity to explore the possibilities that the new medium of digital publishing has to offer.

Theodore Gioia, San Francisco Magazine

New Disruptors 65: Made from Scratch with Jane Friedman and Manjula Martin

March 6, 2014

Jane Friedman and Manjula Martin founded Scratch Magazine, a born-digital publication that tells writers what they‘re worth and how the publishing industry sausage-making factory actually works.

Glenn Fleishman, The New Disruptors

Lukas Volger on a New Kind of Weeknight Cooking

February 11, 2014

I‘ve written two cookbooks and those projects are a long and slow process. I love how rapidly one can publish and engage with recipes online, but I just don‘t have the discipline to blog properly. I‘m an old soul; I need time to mull. The quarterly format allows me to delve into a topic or theme and to flesh it out much more than I would in a blog post, but much less than I would in a book.

Marian Bull, Food 52

Letter to Jane: The Future of Magazine Apps

February 4, 2014

Letter to Jane is by turns surprising, delightful, sensual, engaging, and very smart. It creates a whole new magazine format, one totally unrelated to anything having to do with “print,” while also serving as a vehicle for Tim Moore’s graphic cinematic sensibilities. Letter to Jane is what I always imagined the best magazine apps would be like. It’s both a pure treat to read and view and a major source of inspiration.

Robert Newman, Newmanology

Getting closer to the global newsroom

December 20, 2013

29th Street Publishing has launched a number of brilliantly-conceived and designed free-standing magazine apps (Maura Magazine, The Awl), but this is the first app they’ve created based on an existing print publication. It’s a richly- and elegantly-designed, user-friendly edition that for my money is far superior to the Harper’s print magazine.

Nieman Journalism Lab

The Great Digital Content Pricing Experiment

December 4, 2013

...each publishing platform should serve a distinct purpose for the user, and content should reflect that purpose.

Ellen Harvey, Publishing Executive

At Work With: Bob Newman, Newmanology

November 18, 2013

When I was in the hospital, the only device I had access to was my phone. My phone has been my trusty connection to all things related to media, especially reading. I’ve never spent so much time reading on a mobile device, and I have a much greater affinity now for apps and websites that are mobile-friendly. Those that aren’t force me to do a lot of scrolling and pinch-and-zooming, and it’s too much work. The magazine apps that are designed well for phones, like The New Yorker and the 29th Street Publishing publications, are just a joy to read and interact with.

Jeremy Leslie, magCulture

The Future of Publishing Is Now

October 29, 2013

...what readers want from a magazine is content, and what they love is the brand. So I think that the best response to the challenge of the future, or the future present, is to create the best possible content, to do the highest level of magazine-making and brand creation and extension possible.

Robert Newman, Newmanology

A chat with David Jacobs, co-founder of 29th Street Publishing. Lotsa great titles!

October 22, 2013

There is a feeling about the folks on the edges of publishing and technology that the modern magazine is something more than the replica products that make up the majority of apps right now. But most folks haven’t been a part of that conversation yet. We (along with others) have been trying to push this definition in new directions, but there is a lot of work to do. So we are trying to help spread the gospel, so to speak, of an improved reading & writing experience on mobile.

Jinnie Lee, STET

At Work with Tim Moore, Letter to Jane

October 7, 2013

This week the fourth edition of iPad magazine Letter to Jane is released. The first three editions were edited, designed and coded by Tim Moore from Portland, Oregon. He’s now moved to Manhattan to work with iPad app start-up 29th Street Publishing, from where he looks ahead at his week.”

magCulture

ProPublica Introduces a Magazine to Reach New Readers on Mobile

June 28, 2013

...the magazine will allow ProPublica to be a little more timely, while also being thematic around issues that are important to readers. ”

Justin Ellis, Nieman Journalism Lab

The latest digital trend? Paying for free content

July 25, 2013

...Which brings us to a discovery that some small online-only publishers have made recently: Yes, the Internet is an all-you-can-read buffet with no price tag on most of the stuff, but it turns out that people will happily pay for a nicely curated package of otherwise free stuff, especially if it looks nice and is easy to carry around. And as it becomes harder to support a business only by display advertising, with its ever-dropping value, publishers are urgently looking for other revenue streams.”

Simon Houpt, The Globe and Mail

Past the Paywall

April 10, 2013

Figuring out what readers value means not trying to be all things to all readers. The vast majority of publications do not have the resources to become general interest publications with global reach...”

Olivia Aylmer, The Eye: Columbia Daily Spectator’s Magazine

Pushing Editors Into World of Apps

March 18, 2013

The Midtown-based company promises to take the technical wizardry out of app making, easing the pathway to subscription revenue for those with eager — if nonpaying — online audiences. 29th Street helps its clients, drawn largely from New York City’s deep ranks of freelance writers and independent editors, develop and maintain simple apps for serialized content. The staff also provides gentle nudges to get new editions out on time.

Jackie Bischof, Wall Street Journal

Make It New! Lit(erature) Lights Up

March 11, 2013

A print subscription to One Story, the literary magazine that features a single original story every three weeks, used to mean receiving a tangible sweet little bundle of prose by mail. You could bend it into your pocket, write notes on it, pass it along easily to a friend. Today the ever-clever publishers of One Story have announced a One Story app...

Mary Fichter, 2paragraphs.com

SXSW 2013: For Digital Long Form, Experimentation Ahead

March 9, 2013

Both [Kevin] Nguyen and [Andrew] Womack are bullish on digital publishing consultants/app developer 29th Street Publishing, whose apps offer a high quality reading experience along with subscription revenue. "This is the answer to all of it," Womack said. "This panel [on the future of journalism] will not be necessary next year.

Jonathan Segura, Publishers Weekly

4 Ways Publishers Are Winning With Digital Subscriptions

March 3, 2013

Smaller outlets looking to expand digital readership may find the process easier, thanks to some third-party developers that are helping lower barriers to entry. One company to watch is 29th Street Publishing, an iOS developer that currently builds apps for approximately 20 magazines, some of which are established and others are brand new.

Max Blau, Mashable

Maura Magazine

February 3, 2013

29th Street Publishing continues to show everyone how magazines on the iPhone/iPad should be done with the release of a new title, the weekly Maura Magazine.

Jean Snow, The Magaziner

Interview with Tim Moore, creative director of 29th Street Publishing

January 29, 2013

Among the most exciting developments in iPad app creation has been the rise of magazine apps that are unique, not based on pre-existing publications or their formats. 29th Street Publishing has been in the vanguard of this movement, creating magazine apps from scratch, and using a native technology that is unlike the DPS-style approach that so many print magazines have used for their digital versions.

Robert Newman, SPD

Interview with Tim Moore, creative director of 29th Street Publishing [Extended]

January 28, 2013

I wanted to be a furniture designer, but decided to play it safe and go to college for physics. I got bored and fell in love with film, switched to photography, became disenchanted with galleries and took up art history, graduated with useless degrees and started trying anything and everything and wound up making Letter to Jane. I really don’t know how I got here, I just know that I spent many years doing things that I didn’t feel comfortable doing, things that didn’t click, but I always kept doing things...

Robert Newman, Newmanology

Kill the pageview: 29th Street Publishing looks to profit off small and good

January 28, 2013

Until recently, Web content models have been slightly disappointing, democratizing the publishing process but remaining largely dependent on advertising revenue that in most cases incentivize publishers to rack up as many pageviews as possible. Johnston, a music writer and pop culture critic, believes the pageview-driven model isn’t good for culture, because it constantly pushes discourse towards the mainstream — or a mythic idea of the mainstream, which happens to coincide with a commercially inclined demographic that has a lot of disposable income. And that’s what 29th Street is betting on — that if they can build the tools for publishers, publishers will come up with smart ways to hook subscribers beyond just ad-supported websites. It’s a way to diversify and, hopefully, thrive.

Hamish McKenzie, Pando Daily

29th Street Publishing’s Tim Moore on making apps like movies

January 28, 2013

Do you see yourself as part of the subcompact model for app publishing? It’s funny. I’m kind of in both camps now, and I didn’t mean to be. To me, "subcompact," it’s a great word because it finally gave us a dialogue so everyone has to talk about it. And it gave life to this new platform. When magazines came out they were on these kind of bloated shell-outs and people would just dump in their content. And everyone’s been saying, there’s going to be some kind of native platform that’s going to come out that’s going to be better than this. And subcompact’s really the start of it. We’re maybe 1% realizing what this means. This is something that’s native, it’s not bloated, customizable.

Russell Brandom, The Verge

Just Read It: Magazine Publishers Push Minimalist Apps Without Fluff

January 28, 2013

In addition to bringing accessible, minimalist design to magazine apps, Jacobs also sees the potential for content creators to ensure that their biggest fans can receive, enjoy, and support their work.

Susan Currie Sivek, PBS Mediashift

Test Run: Maura Magazine, an iPad Mini-Mag

January 17, 2013

For me the appeal of these apps is something like the appeal of zines. Of course, these are solidly digital, but something about them still feels tangible, slightly more handmade, like a human carefully, lovingly, put them together.

Jenna Wortham, New York Times

Sick of Pageview Mania, Journalist Maura Johnston Launches Her Own Digital Magazine

January 17, 2013

When the majority of people find themselves dissatisfied with their line of work, they stew in angry silence, perhaps taking to Twitter (or a real-life friend, even) to vent about their stagnated situations. If you’re music journalist Maura Johnston, however, such quiet desperation lights a fire under your desk chair so intense that you get up and move. That’s why Johnston — weary of the pageview-grubbing morass of the Web — has started her own digital magazine replete with content that she would want to read in the format she prefers… Chew on that, media malcontents.

Brenna Ehrlich, O Music Awards, MTV

Maura Johnston’s new song

January 9, 2013

Blogging software has made posting articles to websites as easy as data entry, but creating an iPad app is a much more complicated process. Johnston’s no computer novice — she’s had her own website since 1994 — but developing and maintaining an iPad app would be its own full-time job, a barrier that’s always been too high for most fledgling publications to hurdle. Not anymore! 29th Street Publishing—co-founded by former Six Apart developers David Jacobs and Natalie Podrazik and the New Yorker’s former Web editor, Blake Eskin—has created a platform that makes setting up and updating an app about as easy as updating a blog...

Sara Morrison, Columbia Journalism Review

How publishers are getting over the app debate: 3 examples

December 23, 2012

The point is that publishers no longer face the hard choice between betting the farm on expensive apps or risking being left out of the digital future. Instead, apps have become just one more tool of distribution available in an ever-growing number of shapes, sizes and prices.

Turning to a New York start-up, 29th Street Publishing, The Awl made an app called the Weekend Companion that delivers five new articles to readers’ iPhone or iPad each week. The app’s appeal is that it curates a small set of articles and presents them in a pretty, immersive layout. The articles download quickly and are ready for reading on a train ride or a rainy morning in bed. While the Awl app has discreet tools to share stories by email or text, the overall idea is not interaction but a reflexive, book-like experience.

Jeff John Roberts, paidContent

Apps for Everyone: 29th Street Publishing Helps Writers Get Paid

December 13, 2012

At a time when print magazines such as Newsweek and tablet publications like The Daily are shuttering, the team at 29th Street Publishing is betting on the future of magazines for iPad and iPhone.

Paula Bernstein, Fast Company

29th Street Publishing Remakes iPad Magazines

December 12, 2012

It‘s like a whole new medium developed for today‘s readers, rather than an attempt to recreate an old one.

Jon Mitchell, Read Write Web

29th Street Publishing wants to make selling magazines for iPads as easy as blogging

December 5, 2012

Publishing to a Newsstand app looks a lot like publishing a blog post, a matter of filling in fields — but instead of hitting “Publish” and winding up at a URL, you pop up ready for purchase on iPads and iPhones.

Justin Ellis, Nieman Journalism Lab

29th Street Publishing and the Next Wave of Digital Publishing

December 5, 2012

It’s a bold idea and frankly, I love it. While I personally enjoy the writing on The Awl and instapaper their articles whenever I come across them, I’ve never bothered adding their feeds to my already overflowing reader apps. But an edited collection of some of the web’s best writing, collected every Friday and automatically delivered to my iPad? You bet I’ll pay $4 a month for that.

Jim Ray, Off the Hoof, Mule Design Blog

Publisher Testimonials

March 18, 2013

This is my attempt to bridge the gap between making ‘zines but figuring out a sustainable business model and forging the path. I wanted to break free of page-view culture and unique-view culture that frustrated me as a journalist and an editor...

Maura Johnston, in the Wall Street Journal

December 12, 2012

What I love about 29th Street is first of all their commitment to writers and creative people and also the fact that their model moves the technology out of the exclusive hands of big institutions who can afford expensive development,

Ann Kjellberg, in Fast Company Create

December 5, 2012

29th Street is making top-notch tools that allow publishers of ANY size to find their fit — and publishers don’t have to burn money that isn’t theirs making delivery vehicles like these.

Choire Sicha, in Nieman Lab